Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Magnolia: Harbin Warm Pool or Contact Improv Jams

I'm wondering which is more enjoyable ~ the Harbin warm pool, or a contact improv jam in Marin?


*

And together ... ?

Sunday, March 29, 2009

Pepperomia: Warm Day at Harbin, 'Do Nothing' Liberation, 'Always on' Web, Book Proposals

The day was warm at Harbin with lots of people on the sun deck, and in the pools, and all around, - mostly naked. It's nearly summer again, and a beautiful scene.


*

There's a quality of life apart at Harbin ... where people do nothing and this is liberating :), ~ a pace of life like living in forests and parkland for so many millions of years, as our ancestors most likely did.


**

Time is curious with the 'always on' internet, - it's a real time world wide communication network, where there seems to be a lot more 'now,' than there was before the internet


***

I see 3 projects ahead after my Harbin ethnographic project {and in addition to developing World University and School}, all with digital, virtual world aspects {ethno-wiki-virtual-world-graphy}.


1

An overland Hippie trail ethnography to India, starting in the Haight Ashbury area of San Francisco ...


2

Hippies in India, following the Ramayana epic trail through the south of India, and then to Sri Lanka {Hanuman}, but including Kerala.


3

An ethnographic study of loving bliss, by finding those individuals who seem to elicit this readily and in full measure. Ammaji might be an example ...



Proposals for all of these projects for publishers to come ...


****

I think a Lonely Planet-like Guide to the Hippie Trail will be fascinating to write :)






Friday, March 27, 2009

Archaeopteryx: Magic Bus, Ethnography, Structure, Harbin Hot Springs

Hi Rory, {author of The Magic Bus},


Thanks for your note. Are you in the US to talk about "The Magic Bus: On the Hippie Trail from Istanbul to India" then? Please let me know if you visit the SF Bay Area; I'd try to come to a reading you give. I'm enjoying reading it, too.

Let me briefly outline how I've thought about the structure for my Harbin book thus far. I have two target groups in mind for my Harbin ethnography. One is the academic anthropology community (graduate courses at the University level) and the other is a more general audience, similar, perhaps, to those who might buy "The Magic Bus."

For the first readers {or surfers}, I initially thought to structure this manuscript by writing

1. a 'classic' ethnography especially vis-a-vis the concept of 'place' / the 'field' in anthropology (because as I create a virtual Harbin, the concept of place, or on-the-ground, will be very relevant) using Evans-Pritchard's "The Nuer" or Malinowski's "Argonauts of the Western Pacific" as 'reference' ethnographies, with which to come into conversation. I see Harbin as an expression of counterculture in response to modernity, which has lasted, now, some 37 years. I also see Harbin, as such, as an unique field site, at the end of a road in a beautiful valley, with a fabric of life specific to this valley and emerging over 37 years, - since Ishvara bought the property in 1972; Harbin is also a hot springs retreat center business {Heart Consciousness Church and New Age Church of Being}, with guest accommodations.

2. Next, I've begun to create a virtual Harbin in Second Life, and will write about how the creation of virtual Harbin, with digital, virtual world technologies, is a new form of anthropology, and ethnographic representation, itself.

3. I'll use this virtual Harbin as a field site for ethnographic participant-observation or avatar-participation.

So this project partly involves the creation of a new kind of ethnographic field site, which is comparable to on-the-ground Harbin.

My argument is tentatively that Harbin is an unique response, as place and milieu, to modernity in the form of counterculture, which becomes a kind of hippie organization (commune), and I'd like to observe anthropologically how this 'fabric of life' moves into virtual worlds, in a variety of ways.

So the questions I'm interested in addressing have to do with what has taken shape at Harbin over 37 years, and how might 'counterculture' take new forms in virtual Harbin, which may develop then into a kind of social life of its own.

In the process, I'd also like to engage the only other anthropology of Second Life, the book by UC Irvine Professor Tom Boellstorff called "Coming of Age in Second Life: An Anthropologist Explores the Virtually Human" (Princeton 2007). He also engages "The Nuer" to structure his book. I think virtual worlds are fascinating and will become increasingly significant in the future, and therefore key to my novel and defining approach to ethnography.

For publishing, I have academic presses in mind. The University of California, University of Chicago, Princeton University, Harvard University, and Duke University presses all have published interesting work in related areas recently. But I'm quite interested in your thoughts and experiences about this, too, - as well as how to promote it. I'm also curious how you think one can have fun with all of these aspects of publishing.

For a general audience, I'd like to make the above unique and creative ethnography readable and engaging. Harbin is very colorful and has attracted a lot of fascinating people, and life on the ground there also has fascinating serendipity and synchronicity - energy? - perhaps due to Harbin's clothing-optionalness, its freedom, its rustic accommodations, its bohemian visitors, the natural setting, and especially in the minds of the folks who come there. A lot! of people have come through the gate over the years, but I'm primarily interested in the 10-20 residents who have been there the longest, - around 25-37 years, to start.

I've written a lot about Harbin on my blog - click on the 'Harbin Hot Springs' tag http://scott-macleod.blogspot.com - much of which I'm excerpting and organizing, in addition to 440 pages of field notes I wrote last year, as well as interviews I did.

I'd also like to get this done without too many distractions, or much 'scatteredness,' in the next 3 months, if possible. I may need to speculate about some virtual world aspects, as I don't have the resources to build a full, virtual Harbin, at present, in Second Life, although I do have the beginnings of the Harbin gate house built on the American Anthropologist's virtual campus in-world. I'm eager to focus my writing, and sometimes get bogged down. I may make this a brief book, with additions through subsequent blogging and other developments over the years, as I'd like to return to Harbin in the decades ahead.

I'm very interested in your thoughts and insights about this structure.

I'd love, too, to hear your interview yesterday with Ron Kuby, but haven't found a recording so far. Is there one? Please let me know if you're coming to the SF Bay Area. Good luck with your International Red Cross book.

Starting with the Haight, as you suggest, for an overland trip to India, and another ethnography, is an exciting idea. :) (Setting up wikis - editable web pages - along the way, is also an exciting idea - {ethno-wiki-virtual-world-graphy} - and possibly modeling key places in Second Life, also while underway is a fascinating possibility, - so that people I meet might spend time in-world, in these new 'places,' - when they have the computing resources).

The weather is beautiful here in Canyon, near Berkeley, ~ I'm heading to Harbin soon.

Kind regards,
Scott

http://scottmacleod.com

Mirror of Nature: Turing Test and Chatbots, A Virtual Richard Rorty?

Distinguishing between chat-bots and non-chatbots for humans is becoming very difficult. (See Slashdot - http://tech.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=09/03/26/2115236&from=rss - and Discover Magazine - http://discovermagazine.com/2009/mar/25-how-can-you-tell-if-your-im-buddy-is-really-a-machine/). So chat bots are seeming human, to human judges, and passing the Turing test.

"Every year the Loebner Prize goes to the chatbot (and the corresponding human companion) that fares best on a Turing test administered by a panel of judges. Discover talked to Kevin Warwick, the professor who runs the competition, to get pointers on how one would go about detecting a bot. While there are some general approaches you can use, nothing is foolproof — and asking about Sarah Palin can be downright deceptive. One judge concluded an interlocutor was a bot because it didn't recognize Palin's name ... but it turned out the chatter was a French librarian who'd simply never heard of her." The chat transcripts show how difficult picking abot from non-bot is getting" (http://tech.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=09/03/26/2115236&from=rss).


Does this mean that we might be able to create a 'Richard Rorty' - ... - as artificial intelligence, an idea I've written about before in this blog, and explored in the class I taught on Berkman Island (not on Harvard's faculty) in Second Life for a number of semesters.

See, too -
Philosophy_and_the_Mirror_of_Nature
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophy_and_the_Mirror_of_Nature



Dirty-Mirror-of-Nature



mirror-in-nature


...


Thursday, March 26, 2009

Fireflies in the Woods: Writing, Contact, Counterculture, Freedom

Writing contact improv, ~ just returned from a jam ...

Writing counterculture, a milieu in which contact improv jams took shape

Writing freedom ... :)

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Ripples: Video-Capable Handheld Device, Focusing on Eliciting Loving Bliss

I went to a meeting of technologists tonight and mentioned a video-capable, handheld, internet device - a cellphone which can stream video - and no one seemed to have thought of it. I've looked on the web, and there is very little about it.

Why is this?

Someone asked what my price point would be. {Like One Laptop per Child (OLPC), I suspect we could do this for $10 a handheld, for the developing world, especially. Bandwidth is an interesting challenge}. We have skype, which is free, and seems to not be too limited by bandwidth? What are the limitations to streaming video on the web to cell phone-like devices?

TheFlip.com - Flip Video: The Revolutionary Shoot and Share Camcorder - is close, and very cool.


*

How to elicit loving bliss, when and as one wants it? (I'd like to focus on this elicitation both directly and indirectly).

Sleep and a healthy body are first steps .... time for bed ...


and then flax seed oil {omega 3 fatty acids} with food,

and (a lot of?) affection? Socially ...

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Tribe: Posting An Occasional Link To World University and School, U.S. Rainbow Gathering in New Mexico This Year, Welcome Home

Like Wikipedia, how to invite people to add an occasional teaching link found on the web to World University - worlduniversity.wikia.com?


*

Rainbow Gathering this year will be in New Mexico ~ welcomehere.org/gathering_of_the_tribes/annual/ ~ Welcome Home :)



Granite: Sequoia, Index Investing, Socially Conscious Mutual Funds

Here's the index investing and Bogle blog entry I made on Dec 6, 2008 about socially-conscious INDEX investing -
scott-macleod.blogspot.com/2008/12/american-dipper-nontheist-friends.html.

{The government of Norway also uses social criteria in its investment decisions - see Wikipedia entry on 'socially-responsible investing' - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socially-responsible_investing, as do the Society of Friends (Quakers)}.

And here's Vanguard Mutual Funds' (which launched its first S&P 500-like index fund in 1976) founder Jack Bogle's blog - johncbogle.com/wordpress, as well as a video interview of him from Jan. 9, 2009: forbes.com/2009/01/09/intelligentinvestingbogle.html about index investing and the economy. Jack Bogle continues to sing a remarkably consistent song in praise of index investing, for which there is ample data in support (index investing is statistically most likely to make you the most money in the financial markets over the long run, say, 10 years plus, partly due to low costs), and his index investing position is and has been a very maverick one. I think he's right, and am waiting to hear compelling, reasoned arguments to the contrary. Do you know of any? (Please post them below). Bogle is very lucid at age 80-ish, and suggests in the above video why international index investing, in contrast to domestic index investing, isn't very sensible.

The argument for socially conscious index funds is compelling, but the socially conscious INDEX investing world, in general, hasn't successfully offered low cost index funds yet, comparable with Vanguard's array of mutual funds. In spite of their higher costs, index mutual funds are still compelling due to indexing.


*

World University and School ~ worlduniversity.wikia.com/wiki/World_University ~ will take a kind of indexing approach to education, teaching and learning, by inclusively welcoming all contributors who want to teach or learn, in all languages and subjects - in a kind of group knowledge production approach - but cultivate a high academic standard vis-a-vis MIT Open Course Ware and other great universities.

Add a course / class / something-you-want-to-teach {with your webcam}, or take a courses (on the web via video, or interactively, in Second Life, for example}. World University and School is like Wikipedia with MIT Open Course Ware, and here you can add what you'd like to teach, or find on the web.


**

Both socially conscious investing and World University and School are expressions of caring.

Monday, March 23, 2009

Pasque Flower: In Contact Improv, You Feel People's Minds Through the Contact, World University, Harbin

In contact improv jams, you kind of feel people's minds through the contact ... It's a new way of knowing.


*

World University and School


**

Harbin ethnography ...

Sunday, March 22, 2009

California Newt Eggs: Salamander, Genes, Evolutionary Biological Nihilism, Loving Bliss

Sweet Song and I went to troubleshoot connecting his computer to the Internet via a dial up modem at his friend's house in rural, northern California. On the way home we saw a common, brown California newt, about 8 inches long. I observed that salamanders have been procreating - passing on their genes - for millions of years. Sweet Song who speaks many 'languages,' but who is also quite religiously-minded in a New Age way, which, for him, is influenced by American interpretations of Hinduism emerging from the 1960s - profoundly so, in some ways - and wide-ranging reading, but who is also quite sexually aware, thinks about things much more in religious terms, which sometimes doesn't privilege sexuality, as a key process in life which dates all species back 3.5 billion years - than in evolutionary biological terms.

So, when we saw a newt yesterday, I observed that it's one of so many species that are millions of years old, - just passing its genes through time, kind of arbitrarily. And I sensed that Sweet Song, a good listener and conversant, was slightly more interested in his {'religious'} world view, than in this evolutionary biological observation.

Newts:

chigiy.com/the_gardeners_anonymous_b/images/2007/12/24/newt_2_3.jpg

treknature.com/gallery/photo19752.htm


*

In my own thinking, I've come to a kind of love-life, evolutionary biological nihilistic world view, at times, observing that sociocultural processes are arbitrary in so many ways relative to gene replication, in all species, but particularly for us homo sapiens, who use language so extraordinarily. Gene-replication is the only reason that we're here on this planet {logically, from an evolutionary biological perspective, for which there is so much evidence}, and because of gene-replication and language use, we can think about the wonders of life and ideas uniquely, among all other species, as far as we know.


**

In relation to a love-life, evolutionary biological nihilism (my own), I also think, then, why not richly explore eliciting the neurophysiology of loving bliss, when as and as we want it, naturally, if we can learn how? I find this exploration of loving bliss, neurophysiologically, richly facilitated in fascinating ways at Harbin Hot Springs.


***

I just returned home from the Harbin waters to beautiful Canyon ...

Saturday, March 21, 2009

Bubbles: 'Go Play,' Harbin Gate, What Harbin is About

After you check in at the gate at Harbin, one Harbin resident who has worked there for years often says "Go play."

The interaction 'energy' is good. {He has some native American ancestry, and grew up on the east coast of the U.S., and has been a resident at Harbin for almost 2 decades}. His words in a way say what Harbin is about.

Emerging from the 1960s and 1970s, Harbin is about freedom to play {at Heart Consciousness Church}. A lot of people have come through the Harbin Gate, too, and so many come to play. Harbin is fun (as a response to modernity?).


*

Lao Tzu is supposed to have been asked by the gatekeeper of his city (possibly some 2300 years ago), as he was leaving some strife there (as I've heard the legend), to write down his philosophy, which became the "Tao te Ching" ~ wussu.com/laotzu/index.htm. Successive generations have translated and transcribed this over millennia, and it's a remarkable 81 chapter poems and book.

The Harbin gate seems to work in reverse, where people are welcomed in to soak, and play {and some also create}.


**

Soaking in the waters soon, just past the dragon gate ...

Friday, March 20, 2009

Trout Lilies: Flowers in Canyon are in Full Bloom, and I'm Heading to Harbin

Flowers in Canyon are in full bloom,
and the air is fragrant.

The temperature is comfortable,
and the grasses smell sweetly.

Sun shines brightly here,
but not too strongly.

Spring springs springingly
into now,
and I'm heading to Harbin.















(http://scott-macleod.blogspot.com/2009/03/trout-lilies-flowers-are-in-full-bloom.html - March 20, 2009)

Thursday, March 19, 2009

Blue Flax Meadow: Conversation Comparing Facebook and Second Life, Open Sim and S.L., Flax Seed Oil {Omega-3 Fatty Acids}

Here's an online chat conversation from today with a friend comparing Facebook and Second Life. (I was in FB chat, and he was using Adium multi-chat program).




Drax

scott. wanted to check if u can see this?

i am on a multi-messenger called Adium - http://www.adiumx.com


Scott

the chat, yes


Drax

has AIM, Facebook and Skype

combined


Scott

what's the url?


Drax

ahhh cool!


Scott

like irq?


Drax

http://www.adiumx.com


Scott

yes, cool


Drax

check it out, IMO the best out there so far

have not tried irq


Scott

thanks

irc is what it was called - haven't heard about it recently - and it may be only for xp

but 'fire' in http://download.com also looks interesting.


Drax

i really want SLim to be part of this

Linden needs to promote it more

SLim works great

but no one knows about it


Scott

http://download.cnet.com/1770-20_4-0.html?query=irc&tag=srch&searchtype=downloads&filterName=


Drax

btw if you would like to comment on my status of the facebook versus wasting time on SL debate


Scott

so many new apps - do you know whether open sim improved over the past year?


Drax

there are a few fun comments

open sim is very interesting

but at this point too hard to navigate


Scott

Tao mentioned something about making a switch

not too long ago


Drax

i concentrate on filming

i need the infrastructure

yes, Tao has a system


Scott

as if it might have become a lot less buggy


Drax

of management

which is interesting

not to my knowledge


Scott

OK - it would be great if it would become seamlessly connectible to the SL grid - on a MacMini, for example - would expand virtual worlds dramatically.

when are you next coming to the Bay Area or Harbin, even?


Drax

Bay Area I am end of May

for producers institute at BAVC

May 20-June 1st


Scott

What would make Open Sim become totally easy? Who would say ok gradually at LL?


Drax

are you coming to NMC summer con

Monterey


Scott

Great


Drax

i would say


Scott

No plans yet for Monterey - what's the NMC url?


Drax

integrate the text SL client SLim into multi messengers

http://www.nmc.org

i will speak on Machinima June 12th

Open Sim too hard to navigate

regular SL too hard for general public as it is


Scott

send me an email with urls


Drax

have u seen the facial movement recognition client????

http://sl.vr-wear.com/

amazing start


Scott

so in the poker of virtual worlds, 'hold' on SL and raise the ante with Open Sim to open the 'pot'

I saw Boyo Soll at a Metanomics talk with an animated face - very cool


Drax

hahaha, yes poker

you and Charles Nesson!!!

that obsession with poker

SL definitely hold

it is very healthy for SL to grow like it does


Scott

He's great ... not so much me, and it's only one of his 'cards'


Drax

undisturbed by the hype and expectations


Scott

it's certainly seen hype


Drax

SL needs to grow and it does

and the value is there and people are using it

educators and government agencies

who cares what marketers do!

SL has never fit that easy definition


Scott

yes - how to attract rich creative energy beyond the 'visual'?


Drax

SL is a haven for creatives


Scott

folks like hackers who wrote tcp/ip and a whole bunch of other stuff in the 70s and 80s and 90s


Drax

Facebook is a haven for the scrapbook cut & paste crowd

well, Open Sim is going there

and gives people a lot to do


Scott

yes in so many ways ... but SL somehow isn't social in the way I'm looking for, and in the way FB offers.


Drax

but the great kicker is the enabling factor of REGULAR folks

SL is not social?

i do not agree!


Scott

make building free - OpenSim - and SL will grow with more creatives


Drax

i live in Al Andalus, a global community

we meet, we interact

we are like family


Scott

FB has 175 million users, I've heard; SL with 1.5 million and possibly 25,000-50,000 in-world


Drax

Facebook is nothing more than a picture album


Scott

or logins, I heard


Drax

yes, but the numbers do not matter

what matters is the value and the quality of interaction

in SL i just rebuilt LA in the 40ties


Scott

yes, but people can let it be, for a while and still keep in touch ... SL is amazing ... but


Drax

with a team from all over the globe

in real time

i understand


Scott

I'm so glad to keep in touch with very old friends through FB, - haven't found that in SL


Drax

the comparison to begin with is flawed

well, that is because people do not enter SL, because they have inhibitions

i rather send email than Faceook frankly

if i have asynchronous interaction anyway

why would i be on Facebook?


Scott

except that they're both social networking sites with different emphases but popular and offer opportunities for creativity -


Drax

i don't get that

all the time people are sending me invites to fluff and waste of time stuff


Scott

'hassle' and 'unfamiliar' inhibitions


Drax

i either want real time or not

real time = either real life or SL

asynchronous is email or blogs or forums

why Facebook?

because of the "angels"?

I agree - but FB is manageable, and visual

For many SL is too much, and perhaps it's not enough about 'the individual' - hard to say ...


Scott

I'd love to see the world modeled in SL - perhaps with avatars just like us would make it grow and offer more of the attractions of FB with the real time interactivity of SL, but that will probably come


Drax

i agree partially

SL avatars will look photo realistic in a few years

individuality in SL? it is HUGE!! where is it in FB?


Scott

probably - and the sooner, the more people SL will probably get


Drax

i don't see that in FB at all!

people shy away, they have little attention span

they want fast


Scott

yes, in some ways, but avatars are 'aliens' - part of their attraction, and not like 'the individual'


Drax

in SL i can express myself through my avatar, my land etc

avatars are not aliens, they become manifestations of what is inside us


Scott

true - FB is simple and therefore attractive for many


Drax

we should post this conversation!!

actually in June i am planning on a story about this subject

will interview you in depth!

i gotta run

violin practice


Scott

and FB can 'sit' and, more, I don't know who the avatars are, beyond a few - they aren't my friends


Yes, let's


Drax

enjoyed to talk!!


Scott

bye for now


Drax

hope we can do in person


Scott

likewise

soon ...


*

Anthropologically, these are fascinating social worlds and networks to study and compare, especially ethnographically.

danah boyd (http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts) continues to write in interesting ways about social networking.



**

Omega-3s ~ 1000 mg of flax seed oil, 3-4 times a day ~ are nice. They somehow brighten and harmonize my neurophysiology. (How?)















(http://scott-macleod.blogspot.com/2009/03/blue-flax-meadow-conversation-comparing.html - March 19, 2009)

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

Lagoon Nebula: Poetry, Writing, Freedom

Click on the 'poetry' tag to the right to read some.


*

I've found some freedom in writing poetry.


**

How now to soar, and rollick in loving bliss, via writing poetry?


















(http://scott-macleod.blogspot.com/2009/03/lagoon-nebula-poetry-writing-freedom.html - March 18, 2009)

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

Carnivorous Cobra Lily: Internetity, Video Capable Handheld Device, World University Focuses

"Internetity," refers to the internet age, and supersedes and includes modernity and postmodernity, as a 'condition' informing much of social life today. (See MacLeod, Scott Gordon K. 2001. Gazing at the Box: Tourism in the Context of the Internet and Globalization (Internetity). Accessed online March 17, 2009. http://scottmacleod.com/anth250v.htm.)


*

In thinking about wiring the One Laptop per Child countries for video-capable handheld devices, as a kind of humanitarian project (handheld devices are much more in use in the developing countries than are laptops) to make World University and School Wiki and related video-communication learning and teaching possible, here are a list of bandwidth speeds from Wikipedia.

Internet connection bandwidths

Below is a table showing the maximum bandwidth of common connection types to the internet. For a more detailed list see List of device bandwidths.

56 kbit/s Modem / Dialup
1.5 Mbit/s ADSL Lite
1.544 Mbit/s T1
10 Mbit/s Ethernet
11 Mbit/s Wireless 802.11b
44.736 Mbit/s T3
54 Mbit/s Wireless-G 802.11g
100 Mbit/s Fast Ethernet
155 Mbit/s OC3
300 Mbit/s Wireless-N 802.11n
622 Mbit/s OC12
1000 Mbit/s Gigabit Ethernet
2.5 Gbit/s OC48
9.6 Gbit/s OC192
10 Gbit/s 10 Gigabit Ethernet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bandwidth_(computing)



And here's the last table in a list of device bandwidths (from Wikipedia):

[edit] Digital Video Interconnects

Speeds given are from the video source (e.g. video card) to receiving device (e.g. monitor) only. Out of band and reverse signaling channels are not included.

DisplayPort 1 pair[41] 2.7 Gbit/s 0.3375 GB/s
LVDS Display Interface[42] 2.8 Gbit/s 0.35 GB/s
Serial Digital Interface 2.97 Gbit/s 0.37125 GB/s
Single link DVI 3.96 Gbit/s 0.495 GB/s
HDMI v1.0[43] 4.9 Gbit/s 0.6125 GB/s
DisplayPort 2 pairs[41] 5.4 Gbit/s 0.675 GB/s
Dual link DVI 7.92 Gbit/s 0.99 GB/s
HDMI v1.3[44] 10.2 Gbit/s 1.275 GB/s
DisplayPort 4 pairs[41] 10.8 Gbit/s 1.35 GB/s
HDMI Type B 20.4 Gbit/s 2.55 GB/s

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_device_bandwidths



Let's combine 10 Gbit/s Ethernet fast bandwidth speeds together with HDMI Type B 20.4 Gigabits per second (which is 2.5 Gigabytes per second - GB/s) fast device bandwidths in something like the iPhone or android and you have video-capable handhelds.

Might we do this through Bug Labs ~ buglabs.net ~ and open source hardware?

And start by making this available to disadvantaged groups in Birmingham, Alabama, vis-a-vis One Laptop Per Child?




[The text in this first section is from my first blog entry from March 16, 2009, which is long, and didn't stream to Google Reader - scott-macleod.blogspot.com/2009/03/internetity-bandwidth-world-university.html].


**

Here's the patent for a hand held device capable of communicating audio and video data, which I found on the web:

(US Patent D581429 - Hand held device capable of communicating audio and video data)

http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/D581429/fulltext.html


***

How long until we have video-capable handheld devices? And how long until they are available in the developing world? Will a company like DoCoMo, or Apple, make them? Or will it emerge as open source hardware?


****

World University and School is ahead. How to prioritize the WUaS foundation, so it generates income, and it grows?

How to focus the project? Patiently, and by keeping the project broad.

And how to invite people to wiki - to contribute to and participate - in this group knowledge generating process? Let people know about it.


I continue to develop WUaS, adding Stanford Professor Leonard Susskind's 'Quantum Physics' course today, for example, as well as adding a 'subject' template in which to add courses and URLs (uniform resource locators - web addresses). I'm ready to move the current WUaS into a database, probably into a semantic Wiki, for which I'll need to collaborate.

Monday, March 16, 2009

African Elephant: Freedom Is In Your Bodymind, Loving Bliss 'Switch,' Relaxation Response

Freedom is in your bodymind, but finding this 'freedom' isn't often obvious, in my experience {after social & political freedoms are attained societally}.

For comparison's sake, ingest ecstasy (MDMA) and experience 'loving bliss,' ~ but I haven't yet found a correlated neurophysiological "switch" for freedom {although music leading to specific 'flow' experiences, as well as engaging 'counterculture,' ('tuning in, turning on, dropping out'? hippie 'thinking') can come close for me}.

The relaxation response is a beginning ~ relaxationresponse.org/steps ~ and leads to kinds of freedom, in my experience, but this isn't necessarily rich, rollicking freedom, or subtle, sublime, loving, neural, delicious ongoing 'flow.'


*

Engaging language skillfully, and with awareness, can also create freedom, as can the present ~ now.

{And I privilege thinking our ways to freedom, over not thinking}.


Harbin soon ...

Wild Cobra Lily Plants: Internetity, Bandwidth, World University and School

"Internetity," refers to the internet age, and supersedes and includes modernity and postmodernity, as a 'condition' informing much of social life today. (See MacLeod, Scott Gordon K. 2001. Gazing at the Box: Tourism in the Context of the Internet and Globalization (Internetity). Accessed online March 17, 2009. http://scottmacleod.com/anth250v.htm.)


*

In thinking about wiring 'the' One Laptop per Child countries for video-capable handheld devices, as a kind of humanitarian project (handheld devices are much more in use in the developing countries than are laptops) to make World University and School Wiki and related video-communication learning and teaching possible, here are list of bandwidth speeds from Wikipedia.


Internet connection bandwidths

Below is a table showing the maximum bandwidth of common connection types to the internet. For a more detailed list see List of device bandwidths.

56 kbit/s Modem / Dialup
1.5 Mbit/s ADSL Lite
1.544 Mbit/s T1
10 Mbit/s Ethernet
11 Mbit/s Wireless 802.11b
44.736 Mbit/s T3
54 Mbit/s Wireless-G 802.11g
100 Mbit/s Fast Ethernet
155 Mbit/s OC3
300 Mbit/s Wireless-N 802.11n
622 Mbit/s OC12
1000 Mbit/s Gigabit Ethernet
2.5 Gbit/s OC48
9.6 Gbit/s OC192
10 Gbit/s 10 Gigabit Ethernet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bandwidth_(computing)


**

And here's a list of
device bandwidths:


List of device bandwidths

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This is a list of device bandwidths: the net bit rate (or, more informally, digital bandwidth) of some computer devices employing methods of data transport is quantified in units of kilobits per second (kbit/s), megabits per second (Mbit/s), or gigabits per second (Gbit/s) as appropriate. They are grouped by similar functionality, and then listed in order from lowest bandwidth to highest.

In addition, a common scale is used to better convey the magnitude of change to a non-technical person (for example: a 1.2 kbit/s telephone modem versus a 10,000 kbit/s DSL modem). Whether to use bit/s (b/s) or byte/s (B/s) is often a matter of convention. The most commonly cited unit (bit/s or byte/s) is shown in emboldened type. In general, parallel interfaces are quoted in byte/s (B/s), serial in bit/s. On devices like modems, bytes may be more than 8 bits long because they may be individually padded out with additional start and stop bits; the figures below will reflect this. Where channels use line codes, such as Ethernet, Serial ATA and PCI Express, quoted speeds are for the decoded signal.

Many of these figures are theoretical maxima, and various real-world considerations will generally keep the actual effective throughput much lower. The actual throughput achievable on Ethernet networks, for example (especially when heavily loaded or when running over substandard media), is debatable. The figures are also simplex speeds, which may conflict with the duplex speeds vendors sometimes use in promotional materials.

Contents

[hide]


  • 1 byte = 8 bits
Note: All of the figures listed here use metric (base-10) abbreviations:
  • 1 kbit = 1,000 bits
  • 1 kB = 1,000 bytes
  • 1 MB = 1,000,000 bytes
  • 1 GB = 1,000,000,000 bytes
  • 1 TB = 1,000,000,000,000 bytes
and so on.
(See binary prefixes for additional information on this convention.)
Connection Net bitrate byte/s

[edit] TTY/Teleprinter or Telecommunications device for the deaf

TTY (V.18) 0.045 kbit/s[1] 6 characters/s
TTY (V.18) 0.050 kbit/s 6.6 characters/s
NTSC Line 21 Closed Captioning 1 kbit/s 0.1 kB/s (~100 cps)

[edit] Modems/Broadband connections

Note that the values given are maximum values, and actual values may be slower under certain conditions (for example, noisy phone lines). [2] Where two values are listed, the first value is the downstream rate and the second value is the upstream rate.

300 baud modems operating at 30 characters per second, were often described as "reading speed" since the characters scrolled across the screen at the same rate as most people can read. All modems are assumed to be in serial operation with 1 start bit, 8 data bits, no parity, and 1 stop bit (2 stop bits for 110-baud modems). Therefore, a total of 10 bits (11 bits for 110-baud modems) are needed to transmit each 8-bit byte. The "bytes" column reflects the net data transfer rate after the protocol overhead has been removed.

Device ↓ Speed (kilobits) ↓ Speed (kilobytes) ↓ Inception ↓
Modem 110 baud (symbols / second) 0.11 kbit/s 0.010 kB/s (~10 cps)[3] 1956?
Modem 300 (300 baud) (Bell 103 or V.21) 0.3 kbit/s 0.03 kB/s (~30 cps)[3] 1962 [4]
Modem 1200 (600 baud) (Bell 212A or V.22) 1.2 kbit/s 0.12 kB/s (~120 cps)[3] 1976
Modem 1200/75 (600 baud) (V.23) 1.2/0.75 kbit/s 0.12/0.075 kB/s (~120 cps)[3]
Modem 2400 (600 baud) (V.22bis) 2.4 kbit/s 0.24 kB/s[3]
Modem 4800 (1600 baud) (V.27ter) 4.8 kbit/s 0.48 kB/s[3]
Modem 9600 (2400 baud) (V.32) 9.6 kbit/s 0.96 kB/s[3] 1989 [5]
Modem 14.4 (2400 baud) (V.32bis) 14.4 kbit/s 1.4 kB/s[3] 1991 [6]
Modem 28.8 (3200 baud) (V.34-1994) 28.8 kbit/s 2.9 kB/s[3] 1994 [7]
Modem 33.6 (3429 baud) (V.34-1998) 33.6 kbit/s 3.3 kB/s[3] 1996 [8]
Modem 56k (8000/3429 baud) (V.90) 56.0/33.6 kbit/s[9] 6.6/3.3 kB/s 1998
Modem 56k (8000/8000 baud) (V.92) 56.0/48.0 kbit/s[9] 6.6/5.5 kB/s 1999
Hardware compression (variable) (V.90/V.42bis) 56.0-220.0 kbit/s 6.6-22 kB/s
Hardware compression (variable) (V.92/V.44) 56.0-320.0 kbit/s 6.6-32 kB/s
ISDN Basic Rate Interface (single/dual channel) data 64/128 kbit/s[10] 8/16 kB/s 1986 [11]
IDSL 144 kbit/s 18 kB/s 2000 [12]
HDSL ITU G.991.1 1,544 kbit/s 193 kB/s 1998 [13]
MSDSL 2,000 kbit/s 250 kB/s
SDSL 2,320 kbit/s 290 kB/s
ADSL (typical)[14] 3,000/768 kbit/s 375/96 kB/s 1998
SHDSL ITU G.991.2 5,690 kbit/s 711 kB/s 2001
ADSL 8,192/1,024 kbit/s 1,024/128 kB/s 1998
ADSL (G.DMT) 12,288/1,333 kbit/s 1,536/166 kB/s 1999
ADSL2 12,288/3,584 kbit/s 1,536/448 kB/s 2002
ADSL2+ 24,576/3,584 kbit/s 3,072/448 kB/s 2003
DOCSIS v1.0[15] (Cable modem) 38,000/9,000 kbit/s 4750/1,125 kB/s 1997
DOCSIS v2.0[16] (Cable modem) 38,000/27,000 kbit/s 4750/3375 kB/s 2001
FiOS fiber optic service (typical) 50,000/20,000 kbit/s 6,250/2,500 kB/s
DOCSIS v3.0[17] (Cable modem) 160,000/120,000 kbit/s 20,000/15,000 kB/s 2006
Uni-DSL 200,000 kbit/s 25,000 kB/s
VDSL ITU G.993.1 200,000 kbit/s 25,000 kB/s 2001
VDSL2 ITU G.993.2 250,000 kbit/s 31,250 kB/s 2006
BPON (G.983) fiber optic service 622,000/155,000 kbit/s 77,700/19,300 kB/s 2005[18]
GPON (G.984) fiber optic service 2,488,000/1,244,000 kbit/s 311,000/155,500 kB/s 2008[19]

[edit] Mobile telephone interfaces

Note that the values given are maximum values, and actual values may be slower under certain conditions (for example, noise). Where two values are listed, the first value is the downstream rate and the second value is the upstream rate.

GSM CSD 14.4 kbit/s 1.8 kB/s
HSCSD 57.6/14.4 kbit/s 5.4/1.8 kB/s
GPRS 57.6/28.8 kbit/s 7.2/3.6 kB/s
WiDEN 100 kbit/s 12.5 kB/s
CDMA2000 1xRTT 153 kbit/s 18 kB/s
EDGE (type 1 MS) 236.8 kbit/s 29.6 kB/s
UMTS 384 kbit/s 48 kB/s
EDGE (type 2 MS) 473.6 kbit/s 59.2 kB/s
EDGE Evolution (type 1 MS) 1,184/474 kbit/s 148/59 kB/s
EDGE Evolution (type 2 MS) 1,894/947 kbit/s 237/118 kB/s
1xEV-DO Rev. 0 2,457/153 kbit/s 307.2/19 kB/s
1xEV-DO Rev. A 3,100/1,800 kbit/s 397/230 kB/s
3xEV-DO Rev. B 9,300/5,400 kbit/s 1,162/675 kB/s
HSDPA/HSUPA 14,400/5760 kbit/s 1,800/720 kB/s
4xEV-DO Enhancements (2X2 MIMO) 34,400/12,400 kbit/s 4,300/1,550 kB/s
HSPA+ (2X2 MIMO) 42,000/11,500 kbit/s 5,250/1,437 kB/s
15xEV-DO Rev. B 73,500/27,000 kbit/s 9,200/3,375 kB/s
UMB (2X2 MIMO) 140,000/34,000 kbit/s 17,500/4,250 kB/s
LTE (2X2 MIMO) 173,000/58,000 kbit/s 21,625/7,250 kB/s
UMB (4X4 MIMO) 280,000/68,000 kbit/s 35,000/8,500 kB/s
EV-DO Rev. C 280,000/75,000 kbit/s 35,000/9,000 kB/s
LTE (4X4 MIMO) 326,000/86,000 kbit/s 40,750/10,750 kB/s

[edit] Wide area network

Note that the values given are maximum values, and actual values may be slower under certain conditions (for example, noise). Where two values are listed, the first value is the downstream rate and the second value is the upstream rate.

DS0 0.064 Mbit/s (or 0.056 with robbed bit signaling) 0.008 MB/s
G.Lite (aka ADSL Lite) 1.536/0.512 Mbit/s 0.192/0.064 MB/s
DS1/T1 (and ISDN Primary Rate Interface) 1.544 Mbit/s 0.192 MB/s
E1 (and ISDN Primary Rate Interface) 2.048 Mbit/s 0.256 MB/s
G.SHDSL 2.304 Mbit/s 0.288 MB/s
LR-VDSL2 (4 to 5 km [long-]range) (symmetry optional) 4 Mbit/s 0.512 MB/s
SDSL[20] 2.32 Mbit/s 0.29 MB/s
T2 6.312 Mbit/s 0.789 MB/s
ADSL[21] 8.0/1.024 Mbit/s 1/0.128 MB/s
E2 8.448 Mbit/s 1.056 MB/s
ADSL2 12/3.5 Mbit/s 1.5/0.448 MB/s
Satellite Internet[22] 16/1 Mbit/s 2.0/0.128 MB/s
ADSL2+ 24/3.5 Mbit/s 3.0/0.448 MB/s
E3 34.368 Mbit/s 4.296 MB/s
DOCSIS v1.0 (Cable modem)[15] 38.0/10.0 Mbit/s 4.75/1.25 MB/s
DOCSIS v2.0 (Cable modem)[16] 40/30 Mbit/s 5.0/3.75 MB/s
DS3/T3 ('45 Meg') 44.736 Mbit/s 5.5925 MB/s
STS-1/EC-1/OC-1/STM-0 51.84 Mbit/s 6.48 MB/s
OC-1 51.84 Mbit/s 6.48 MB/s
VDSL (symmetry optional) 100 Mbit/s 12.5 MB/s
DOCSIS v3.0 (Cable modem)[17] 160/120 Mbit/s 20/15 MB/s
OC-3/STM-1 155.52 Mbit/s 19.44 MB/s
VDSL2 (symmetry optional) 250 Mbit/s 31.25 MB/s
T4 274.176 Mbit/s 34.272 MB/s
T5 400.352 Mbit/s 50.044 MB/s
OC-9 466.56 Mbit/s 58.32 MB/s
OC-12/STM-4 622.08 Mbit/s 77.76 MB/s
OC-18 933.12 Mbit/s 116.64 MB/s
OC-24 1,244 Mbit/s 155.5 MB/s
OC-36 1,900 Mbit/s 237.5 MB/s
OC-48/STM-16 2,488 Mbit/s 311.04 MB/s
OC-96 4,976 Mbit/s 622 MB/s
OC-192/STM-64 9,953 Mbit/s 1,244 MB/s
10 Gigabit Ethernet WAN PHY 9,953 Mbit/s 1,244 MB/s
10 Gigabit Ethernet LAN PHY 10,000 Mbit/s 1,250 MB/s
OC-256 13,271 Mbit/s 1,659 MB/s
OC-768/STM-256 39,813 Mbit/s 4,976 MB/s
OC-1536/STM-512 79,626 Mbit/s 9,953 MB/s
OC-3072/STM-1024 159,252 Mbit/s 19,907 MB/s

[edit] Local area network

Note: Actual data throughput is much less than bandwidth of the data transmitted due to overhead and other factors, so do not mistake its speed as actual data transfer rate. "Typically one can expect about ⅓–⅔ of the actual speed based on several factors such as traffic. Also, if there are problems in your physical layer causing retransmissions, your throughput will suffer as well." [23]

LocalTalk 0.230 Mbit/s 0.0288 MB/s
Econet 0.800 Mbit/s 0.1 MB/s
PC-Network 2 Mbit/s 0.25 MB/s
ARCNET (Standard) 2.5 Mbit/s 0.3125 MB/s
Ethernet Experimental 3 Mbit/s 0.375 MB/s
Token Ring (Original) 4 Mbit/s 0.5 MB/s
Ethernet (10base-X) 10 Mbit/s 1.25 MB/s
Token Ring (Later) 16 Mbit/s 2 MB/s
ARCnet Plus 20 Mbit/s 2.5 MB/s
Token Ring IEEE 802.5t 100 Mbit/s 12.5 MB/s
Fast Ethernet (100base-X) 100 Mbit/s 12.5 MB/s
FDDI 100 Mbit/s 12.5 MB/s
FireWire (IEEE 1394) 400[24][25] 393.216 Mbit/s 49.152 MB/s
HIPPI 800 Mbit/s 100 MB/s
Token Ring IEEE 802.5v (no known implementations) 1,000 Mbit/s 125 MB/s
Gigabit Ethernet (1000base-X) 1,000 Mbit/s 125 MB/s
Myrinet 2000 2,000 Mbit/s 250 MB/s
Infiniband SDR 1X[26] 2,000 Mbit/s 250 MB/s
Quadrics QsNetI 3,600 Mbit/s 450 MB/s
Infiniband DDR 1X[26] 4,000 Mbit/s 500 MB/s
Infiniband QDR 1X[26] 8,000 Mbit/s 1,000 MB/s
Infiniband SDR 4X[26] 8,000 Mbit/s 1,000 MB/s
Quadrics QsNetII 8,000 Mbit/s 1,000 MB/s
10 Gigabit Ethernet (10Gbase-X) 10,000 Mbit/s 1,250 MB/s
Myri 10G 10,000 Mbit/s 1,250 MB/s
Infiniband DDR 4X[26] 16,000 Mbit/s 2,000 MB/s
Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI) Dual Channel SCI, x8 PCIe 20,000 Mbit/s 2,500 MB/s
Infiniband SDR 12X[26] 24,000 Mbit/s 3,000 MB/s
Infiniband QDR 4X[26] 32,000 Mbit/s 4,000 MB/s
Infiniband DDR 12X[26] 48,000 Mbit/s 6,000 MB/s
Infiniband QDR 12X[26] 96,000 Mbit/s 12,000 MB/s
100 Gigabit Ethernet (100Gbase-X) 100,000 Mbit/s 12,500 MB/s

[edit] Wireless networking

Note: 802.11 networks are half-duplex; all stations share the medium. In access point mode, all traffic has to pass through the AP (Access Point). Two stations on the same AP which are communicating with each other will have all traffic pass the medium twice: once sent by the sender to the AP, then from AP to receiver, thus approximately halving the effective bandwidth.

802.11 (legacy) 0.125 2.0 Mbit/s 0.25 MB/s
RONJA free space optical wireless 10.0 Mbit/s 1.25 MB/s
802.11b DSSS 0.125 11.0 Mbit/s 1.375 MB/s
802.11b+ (TI-proprietary extension to 802.11b, non-IEEE standard[27][28]) DSSS 0.125 44.0 Mbit/s 5.5 MB/s
802.11a 0.75 54.0 Mbit/s 6.75 MB/s
802.11g OFDM 0.125 54.0 Mbit/s 6.75 MB/s
802.16 (WiMAX) 70.0 Mbit/s 8.75 MB/s
802.11g with Super GAtheros-proprietary extension to 802.11g) DSSS 0.125 ( 108.0 Mbit/s 13.5 MB/s
802.11g with 125HSM (a.k.a. Afterburner, Broadcom-proprietary extension to 802.11g) 125.0 Mbit/s 15.625 MB/s
802.11g with Nitro (Conexant-proprietary extension to 802.11g) 140.0 Mbit/s 17.5 MB/s
802.11n 600.0 Mbit/s 75 MB/s

[edit] Wireless device connection

IrDA-Control 72 kbit/s 9 kB/s
IrDA-SIR 115.2 kbit/s 14 kB/s
802.15.4 (2.4 GHz) 250 kbit/s 31.25 kB/s
Bluetooth 1.1 1,000 kbit/s 125 kB/s
Bluetooth 2.0+EDR 3,000 kbit/s 375 kB/s
IrDA-FIR 4,000 kbit/s 510 kB/s
IrDA-VFIR 16,000 kbit/s 2,000 kB/s
IrDA-UFIR 100,000 kbit/s 12,500 kB/s
WUSB-UWB 480,000 kbit/s 60,000 kB/s

[edit] Computer buses

I2c 3.4 Mbit/s 425 kB/s
ISA 8-Bit/4.77 MHz[29] 9.6 Mbit/s 1.2 MB/s
Zorro II 16-Bit/7.14 MHz[30] 28.56 Mbit/s 3.56 MB/s
ISA 16-Bit/8.33 MHz[29] 42.4 Mbit/s 5.3 MB/s
Low Pin Count 133.33 Mbit/s 16.67 MB/s
HP-Precision Bus 184 Mbit/s 23 MB/s
EISA 8-16-32bits/8.33 MHz 320 Mbit/s 32 MB/s
VME64 32-64bits 400 Mbit/s 40 MB/s
NuBus 10 MHz 400 Mbit/s 40 MB/s
DEC TURBOchannel 32-bit/12.5 MHz 400 Mbit/s 50 MB/s
MCA 16-32bits/10 MHz 660 Mbit/s 66 MB/s
NuBus90 20 MHz 800 Mbit/s 80 MB/s
Sbus 32-bit/25 MHz 800 Mbit/s 100 MB/s
DEC TURBOchannel 32-bit/25 MHz 800 Mbit/s 100 MB/s
VLB 32-bit/33 MHz 1,067 Mbit/s 133.33 MB/s
PCI 32-bit/33 MHz 1,067 Mbit/s 133.33 MB/s
HP GSC-1X 1,136 Mbit/s 142 MB/s
Zorro III[31][32][33] 32-Bit/37.5 MHz 1,200 Mbit/s 150 MB/s
Sbus 64-bit/25 MHz 1,600 Mbit/s 200 MB/s
PCI Express 1.0 (x1 link)[34] 2,000 Mbit/s 250 MB/s
HP GSC-2X 2,048 Mbit/s 256 MB/s
PCI 64-bit/33 MHz 2,133 Mbit/s 266.7 MB/s
PCI 32-bit/66 MHz 2,133 Mbit/s 266.7 MB/s
AGP 1x 2,133 Mbit/s 266.7 MB/s
HIO bus 2,560 Mbit/s 320 MB/s
PCI Express (x2 link)[34] 4,000 Mbit/s 500 MB/s
AGP 2x 4,266 Mbit/s 533.3 MB/s
PCI 64-bit/66 MHz 4,266 Mbit/s 533.3 MB/s
PCI-X DDR 16-bit 4,266 Mbit/s 533.3 MB/s
PCI 64-bit/100 MHz 6,399 Mbit/s 800 MB/s
PCI Express (x4 link)[34] 8,000 Mbit/s 1,000 MB/s
AGP 4x 8,533 Mbit/s 1,067 MB/s
PCI-X 133 8,533 Mbit/s 1,067 MB/s
PCI-X QDR 16-bit 8,533 Mbit/s 1,067 MB/s
InfiniBand single 4X[26] 8,000 Mbit/s 1,000 MB/s
UPA 15,360 Mbit/s 1,920 MB/s
PCI Express (x8 link)[34] 16,000 Mbit/s 2,000 MB/s
AGP 8x 17,066 Mbit/s 2,133 MB/s
PCI-X DDR 17,066 Mbit/s 2,133 MB/s
HyperTransport (800 MHz, 16-pair) 25,600 Mbit/s 3,200 MB/s
HyperTransport (1 GHz, 16-pair) 32,000 Mbit/s 4,000 MB/s
PCI Express (x16 link)[34] 32,000 Mbit/s 4,000 MB/s
PCI Express 2.0 (x8 link)[35] 32,000 Mbit/s 4,000 MB/s
PCI-X QDR 34,133 Mbit/s 4,266 MB/s
AGP 8x 64-bit 34,133 Mbit/s 4,266 MB/s
PCI Express (x32 link)[34] 64,000 Mbit/s 8,000 MB/s
PCI Express 2.0 (x16 link)[35] 64,000 Mbit/s 8,000 MB/s
QuickPath Interconnect (2.4 GHz) 76,800 Mbit/s 9,600 MB/s
QuickPath Interconnect (3.2 GHz) 102,400 Mbit/s 12,800 MB/s
PCI Express 2.0 (x32 link)[35] 128,000 Mbit/s 16,000 MB/s
HyperTransport (2.8 GHz, 32-pair) 179,200 Mbit/s 22,400 MB/s
HyperTransport 3.1 (3.2 GHz, 32-pair) 409,600 Mbit/s 51,200 MB/s

[edit] Portable Computer buses

PC Card 16 bit 255ns Byte mode 31.36 Mbit/s 3.92 MB/s
PC Card 16 bit 255ns Word mode 62.72 Mbit/s 7.84 MB/s
PC Card 16 bit 100ns Byte mode 80 Mbit/s 10 MB/s
PC Card 16 bit 100ns Word mode 160 Mbit/s 20 MB/s
PC Card 32 bit (CardBus) Byte mode 267 Mbit/s 33.33 MB/s
ExpressCard USB mode 480 Mbit/s 60 MB/s
PC Card 32 bit (CardBus) Word mode 533 Mbit/s 66.66 MB/s
PC Card 32 bit (CardBus) DWord mode 1,067 Mbit/s 133.33 MB/s
ExpressCard PCI Express mode 2,000 Mbit/s 250 MB/s

[edit] Computer buses (storage)

PC Floppy Disk Controller (1.44MB) 0.5 Mbit/s 0.062 MB/s
CD Controller (1x) 1.4112 Mbit/s 0.1764 MB/s
MFM 5 Mbit/s 0.625 MB/s
RLL 7.5 Mbit/s 0.9375 MB/s
DVD Controller (1x) 11.1 Mbit/s 1.32 MB/s
ESDI 24 Mbit/s 3 MB/s
ATA PIO Mode 0 26.4 Mbit/s 3.3 MB/s
SCSI (Narrow SCSI) (5 MHz)[36] 40 Mbit/s 5 MB/s
ATA PIO Mode 1 41.6 Mbit/s 5.2 MB/s
ATA PIO Mode 2 66.4 Mbit/s 8.3 MB/s
Fast SCSI (8 bits/10 MHz) 80 Mbit/s 10 MB/s
ATA PIO Mode 3 88.8 Mbit/s 11.1 MB/s
iSCSI over Fast Ethernet 100 Mbit/s 12.5 MB/s
ATA PIO Mode 4 133.3 Mbit/s 16.7 MB/s
Fast Wide SCSI (16 bits/10 MHz) 160 Mbit/s 20 MB/s
Ultra SCSI (Fast-20 SCSI) (8 bits/20 MHz) 160 Mbit/s 20 MB/s
Ultra DMA ATA 33 264 Mbit/s 33 MB/s
Ultra Wide SCSI (16 bits/20 MHz) 320 Mbit/s 40 MB/s
Ultra2 SCSI 40 (Fast-40 SCSI) (8 bits/40 MHz) 320 Mbit/s 40 MB/s
Ultra DMA ATA 66 528 Mbit/s 66 MB/s
Ultra-2 wide SCSI (16 bits/40 MHz) 640 Mbit/s 80 MB/s
Serial Storage Architecture SSA 640 Mbit/s 80 MB/s
Ultra DMA ATA 100 800 Mbit/s 100 MB/s
Fibre Channel 1GFC (1.0625 GHz)[37] 850 Mbit/s 106.25 MB/s
iSCSI over Gigabit Ethernet 1,000 Mbit/s 125 MB/s
Ultra DMA ATA 133 1,064 Mbit/s 133 MB/s
Ultra-3 SCSI (Ultra 160 SCSI; Fast-80 Wide SCSI) (16 bits/40 MHz DDR) 1,280 Mbit/s 160 MB/s
Serial ATA (SATA-150)[38] 1,200 Mbit/s 150 MB/s
Fibre Channel 2GFC (2.125 GHz)[37] 1,700 Mbit/s 212.5 MB/s
Serial ATA 2 (SATA-300)[38] 2,400 Mbit/s 300 MB/s
Serial Attached SCSI (SAS)[38] 2,400 Mbit/s 300 MB/s
Ultra-320 SCSI (Ultra4 SCSI) (16 bits/80 MHz DDR) 2,560 Mbit/s 320 MB/s
Fibre Channel 4GFC (4.25 GHz)[37] 3,400 Mbit/s 425 MB/s
Serial ATA (SATA-600)[38] 4,800 Mbit/s 600 MB/s
Ultra-640 SCSI (16 bits/160 MHz DDR) 5,120 Mbit/s 640 MB/s
Serial Attached SCSI 2[38] 4,800 Mbit/s 600 MB/s
Fibre Channel 8GFC (8.50 GHz)[37] 6,800 Mbit/s 850 MB/s
iSCSI over 10G Ethernet (Very few products exist) 10,000 Mbit/s 1,250 MB/s
iSCSI over 100G Ethernet (Planned) 100,000 Mbit/s 12,500 MB/s

[edit] Computer buses (external)

Apple Desktop Bus 0.010 Mbit/s 0.00125 MB/s
MIDI 0.0313 Mbit/s 0.0039 MB/s
Serial RS-232 max 0.2304 Mbit/s 0.02197 MB/s
Parallel (Centronics) CPP ~133 kHz 1 Mbit/s 0.133 MB/s
Serial 16550 UART max 1.5 Mbit/s 0.15 MB/s
USB Low Speed (USB 1.0) 1.536 Mbit/s 0.192 MB/s
Serial UART max 2.7648 Mbit/s 0.3456 MB/s
Serial RS-422 max 10 Mbit/s 1.25 MB/s
USB Full Speed (USB 1.1) 12 Mbit/s 1.5 MB/s
Parallel (Centronics) EPP 2 MHz 16 Mbit/s 2 MB/s
Serial EIA-485 max 35 Mbit/s 3.5 MB/s
FireWire (IEEE 1394) 100 98.304 Mbit/s 12.288 MB/s
FireWire (IEEE 1394) 200 196.608 Mbit/s 24.576 MB/s
FireWire (IEEE 1394) 400 393.216 Mbit/s 49.152 MB/s
USB Hi-Speed (USB 2.0) 480 Mbit/s 60 MB/s
FireWire (IEEE 1394b) 800[39] 786.432 Mbit/s 98.304 MB/s
Fibre Channel 1Gb SCSI 1,062.5 Mbit/s 100 MB/s
FireWire (IEEE 1394b) 1600[39] 1,573 Mbit/s 196.6 MB/s
Camera Link Base (single) 24bit 85 MHz[40] 2,040 Mbit/s 261.12 MB/s
Fibre Channel 2Gb SCSI 2,125 Mbit/s 200 MB/s
eSATA (SATA 300) 2,400 Mbit/s 300 MB/s
FireWire (IEEE 1394b) 3200[39] 3,145.7 Mbit/s 393.216 MB/s
Fibre Channel 4Gb SCSI 4,250 Mbit/s 531.25 MB/s
USB 3.0 (Planned) 4,800 Mbit/s 600 MB/s
Camera Link Full (dual) 72bit 85 MHz[40] 6,120 Mbit/s 765 MB/s
External PCI Express x16 (planned) 32,000Mbit/s 4,000 MB/s

[edit] Computer buses (MAC to PHY)

MII (4 Lanes) 100 Mbit/s 12.5 MB/s
RMII (2 Lanes) 100 Mbit/s 12.5 MB/s
SMII (1 Lane) 100 Mbit/s 12.5 MB/s
GMII (8 Lanes) 1.0 Gbit/s 125 MB/s
RGMII (4 Lanes) 1.0 Gbit/s 125 MB/s
SGMII (2 Lanes) 1.0 Gbit/s 125 MB/s
XGMII (32 Lanes) 10.0 Gbit/s 1.25 GB/s
XAUI (4 Lanes) 10.0 Gbit/s 1.25 GB/s
XLGMII (planned) 40.0 Gbit/s 5 GB/s
CGMII (planned) 100.0 Gbit/s 12.5 GB/s

[edit] Computer buses (PHY to XPDR)

XSBI (16 Lanes) 0.995 Gbit/s 0.124 GB/s

[edit] Memory Interconnect Buses / RAM

NOTE: Dual channel bandwidths are theoretical maximums and do not always reflect real world performance. In many cases, performance may be closer to single channel operation (half the bandwidth).

FPM DRAM 1.408 Gbit/s 0.176 GB/s
EDO DRAM 2.112 Gbit/s 0.264 GB/s
SPARC MBus 2.55 Gbit/s 0.32 GB/s
PC66 SDRAM 4.264 Gbit/s 0.533 GB/s
PC100 SDRAM 6.4 Gbit/s 0.8 GB/s
HP Runway bus 125 MHz 64-bit 6.4 Gbit/s 0.8 GB/s
PC133 SDRAM 8.528 Gbit/s 1.066 GB/s
PC800 RDRAM (single-channel) 12.8 Gbit/s 1.6 GB/s
PC1600 DDR-SDRAM (single channel) 12.8 Gbit/s 1.6 GB/s
HP Runway bus 125 MHz 64-bit DDR 16 Gbit/s 2 GB/s
PC1066 RDRAM (single-channel) 16.8 Gbit/s 2.1 GB/s
PC2100 DDR-SDRAM (single channel) 16.8 Gbit/s 2.1 GB/s
PC1200 RDRAM (single-channel) 19.2 Gbit/s 2.4 GB/s
PC2700 DDR-SDRAM (single channel) 21.6 Gbit/s 2.7 GB/s
PC800 RDRAM (dual-channel) 25.6 Gbit/s 3.2 GB/s
PC1600 DDR-SDRAM (dual channel) 25.6 Gbit/s 3.2 GB/s
PC3200 DDR-SDRAM (single channel) 25.6 Gbit/s 3.2 GB/s
PC2-3200 DDR2-SDRAM (single channel) 25.6 Gbit/s 3.2 GB/s
PC1066 RDRAM (dual-channel) 33.6 Gbit/s 4.2 GB/s
PC2100 DDR-SDRAM (dual channel) 33.6 Gbit/s 4.2 GB/s
PC2-4200 DDR2-SDRAM (single channel) 34.1 Gbit/s 4.3 GB/s
PC4000 DDR-SDRAM (single channel) 34.3 Gbit/s 4.287 GB/s
PC1200 RDRAM (dual-channel) 38.4 Gbit/s 4.8 GB/s
PC2-5300 DDR2-SDRAM (single channel) 42.4 Gbit/s 5.3 GB/s
PC2-5400 DDR2-SDRAM (single channel) 42.7 Gbit/s 5.3 GB/s
PC2700 DDR-SDRAM (dual channel) 43.2 Gbit/s 5.4 GB/s
PC3200 DDR-SDRAM (dual channel) 51.2 Gbit/s 6.4 GB/s
PC2-3200 DDR2-SDRAM (dual channel) 51.2 Gbit/s 6.4 GB/s
PC2-6400 DDR2-SDRAM (single channel) 51.2 Gbit/s 6.4 GB/s
Itanium zx1 bus 51.2 Gbit/s 6.4 GB/s
PC4000 DDR-SDRAM (dual channel) 67.2 Gbit/s 8.4 GB/s
PC2-4200 DDR2-SDRAM (dual channel) 67.2 Gbit/s 8.4 GB/s
PC2-5300 DDR2-SDRAM (dual channel) 84.8 Gbit/s 10.6 GB/s
PC2-5400 DDR2-SDRAM (dual channel) 85.3 Gbit/s 10.7 GB/s
PC2-6400 DDR2-SDRAM (dual channel) 102.4 Gbit/s 12.8 GB/s
PC2-8000 DDR2-SDRAM (dual channel) 128.0 Gbit/s 16.0 GB/s
PC2-8500 DDR2-SDRAM (dual channel) 136.0 Gbit/s 17 GB/s
PC3-8500 DDR3-SDRAM (dual channel) 136.0 Gbit/s 17.0 GB/s
PC3-10600 DDR3-SDRAM (dual channel) 165.6 Gbit/s 21.2 GB/s
PC3-12800 DDR3-SDRAM (dual channel) 204.8 Gbit/s 25.6 GB/s
PC3-16000 DDR3-SDRAM (dual channel) 256.0 Gbit/s 32.0 GB/s
PC3-12800 DDR3-SDRAM (triple channel) 307.2 Gbit/s 38.4 GB/s
PC3-16000 DDR3-SDRAM (triple channel) 480.4 Gbit/s 48.4 GB/s

[edit] Digital Audio

S/PDIF 3.072 Mbit/s 0.384MB/s

[edit] Digital Video Interconnects

Speeds given are from the video source (e.g. video card) to receiving device (e.g. monitor) only. Out of band and reverse signaling channels are not included.

DisplayPort 1 pair[41] 2.7 Gbit/s 0.3375 GB/s
LVDS Display Interface[42] 2.8 Gbit/s 0.35 GB/s
Serial Digital Interface 2.97 Gbit/s 0.37125 GB/s
Single link DVI 3.96 Gbit/s 0.495 GB/s
HDMI v1.0[43] 4.9 Gbit/s 0.6125 GB/s
DisplayPort 2 pairs[41] 5.4 Gbit/s 0.675 GB/s
Dual link DVI 7.92 Gbit/s 0.99 GB/s
HDMI v1.3[44] 10.2 Gbit/s 1.275 GB/s
DisplayPort 4 pairs[41] 10.8 Gbit/s 1.35 GB/s
HDMI Type B 20.4 Gbit/s 2.55 GB/s


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_device_bandwidths


***

Let's combine 10 Gbit/s Ethernet
fast bandwidth speeds together with HDMI Type B 20.4 Gigabits per second (which is 2.5 Gigabytes per second - GB/s) fast device bandwidths in something like the iPhone or android and you have video-capability.

Start by making this available to disadvantaged groups in Birmingham, Alabama, vis-a-vis OLPC?